THE OAS STATEMENT OF ETHICAL PRINCIPLES

Archaeology is the search to know and understand humanity’s past. This desire to learn about our common heritage is shared with many groups including: First Nations; avocationals; students; teachers; genealogists; historians; cultural resource managers; academic researchers; and the public at large. In order to protect the information obtained from archaeological sites so that all will benefit, each archaeological practitioner must adhere to a set of principles and ethics. The members of the Society are proud to proclaim adherence to the following principles.

1 We respect and support all relevant Ontario, Canadian and International legislation and/or Conventions that deal with the practice of archaeology, and the preservation of any nation’s heritage.

2 We oppose the purchase, sale and trading of genuine archaeological artifacts, and believe that licensed archaeologists hold artifacts in trust for the people of Ontario until a suitable repository can be found.

3 We believe that it is the responsibility of archaeologists to disseminate the results of research to the archaeological community as well as to the general public in an easily accessible manner, medium and format.

4 We encourage archaeological licence holders to sign the freedom of information declaration that accompanies their licence. This declaration allows the Ministry to promptly release reports without the requirement of contacting the authors for approval.

5 We view altering artifacts, records and/or falsifying reports prepared by others as unacceptable behaviour. Reporting information gathered by others without citation is also deemed unethical.

6 We believe that differing hypotheses must be freely proposed and tested, and that we will contribute to collective knowledge through constructive criticism.

7 We respect the right of First Nations to play a primary role in the conduct of any aboriginal archaeological investigation.

8 We affirm that every reasonable effort should be made to consult and cooperate with First Nations in the stewardship, conservation, and display of aboriginal artifacts, and that the wishes of First Nations must be respected concerning disturbance and re-interment of human remains.

9 We promote stewardship of all archaeological resources, materials from archaeological investigations including artifacts, reports, notes, photos, etc., and believe that these should be maintained in an appropriate repository for long term conservation.

10 Members are obligated to notify the Board of Directors of any material breach of these ethical guidelines, and we support initiatives that the Board may implement to obtain fair resolution to such breach, or to resort to remedies as provided for in our constitution.


effective March 31, 2003

Archaeology is the search to know and understand humanityís past. This desire to learn about our common heritage is shared with many groups including: First Nations; avocationals; students; teachers; genealogists; historians; cultural resource managers; academic researchers; and the public at large. In order to protect the information obtained from archaeological sites so that all will benefit, each archaeological practitioner must adhere to a set of principles and ethics. The members of the Society are proud to proclaim adherence to the following principles.

1 We respect and support all relevant Ontario, Canadian and International legislation and/or Conventions that deal with the practice of archaeology, and the preservation of any nationís heritage.

2 We oppose the purchase, sale and trading of genuine archaeological artefacts, and believe that licensed archaeologists hold artefacts in trust for the people of Ontario until a suitable repository can be found.

3 We believe that it is the responsibility of archaeologists to disseminate the results of research to the archaeological community as well as to the general public in an easily accessible manner, medium and format.

4 We encourage archaeological licence holders to sign the freedom of information declaration that accompanies their licence. This declaration allows the Ministry to promptly release reports without the requirement of contacting the authors for approval.

5 We view altering artefacts, records and/or falsifying reports prepared by others as unacceptable behaviour. Reporting information gathered by others without citation is also deemed unethical.

6 We believe that differing hypotheses must be freely proposed and tested, and that we will contribute to collective knowledge through constructive criticism.

7 We respect the right of First Nations to play a primary role in the conduct of any aboriginal archaeological investigation.

8 We affirm that every reasonable effort should be made to consult and cooperate with First Nations in the stewardship, conservation, and display of aboriginal artefacts, and that the wishes of First Nations must be respected concerning disturbance and re-interment of human remains.

9 We promote stewardship of all archaeological resources, materials from archaeological investigations including artefacts, reports, notes, photos, etc., and believe that these should be maintained in an appropriate repository for long term conservation.

10 Members are obligated to notify the Board of Directors of any material breach of these ethical guidelines, and we support initiatives that the Board may implement to obtain fair resolution to such breach, or to resort to remedies as provided for in our Constitution.

Effective March 31, 2003



Archaeology is the search to know and understand humanityís past. This desire to learn about our common heritage is shared with many groups including: First Nations; avocationals; students; teachers; genealogists; historians; cultural resource managers; academic researchers; and the public at large. In order to protect the information obtained from archaeological sites so that all will benefit, each archaeological practitioner must adhere to a set of principles and ethics. The members of the Society are proud to proclaim adherence to the following principles.

1. We respect and support all relevant Ontario, Canadian and International legislation and/or Conventions that deal with the practice of archaeology, and the preservation of any nationís heritage.

2. We oppose the purchase, sale and trading of genuine archaeological artefacts, and believe that licensed archaeologists hold artefacts in trust for the people of Ontario until a suitable repository can be found.

3. We believe that it is the responsibility of archaeologists to disseminate the results of research to the archaeological community as well as to the general public in an easily accessible manner, medium and format.

4. We encourage archaeological licence holders to sign the freedom of information declaration that accompanies their licence. This declaration allows the Ministry to promptly release reports without the requirement of contacting the authors for approval.

5. We view altering artefacts, records and/or falsifying reports prepared by others as unacceptable behaviour. Reporting information gathered by others without citation is also deemed unethical.

6. We believe that differing hypotheses must be freely proposed and tested, and that we will contribute to collective knowledge through constructive criticism.

7. We respect the right of First Nations to play a primary role in the conduct of any aboriginal archaeological investigation.

8. We affirm that every reasonable effort should be made to consult and cooperate with First Nations in the stewardship, conservation, and display of aboriginal artefacts, and that the wishes of First Nations must be respected concerning disturbance and re-interment of human remains.

9. We promote stewardship of all archaeological resources, materials from archaeological investigations including artefacts, reports, notes, photos, etc., and believe that these should be maintained in an appropriate repository for long term conservation.

10. Members are obligated to notify the Board of Directors of any material breach of these ethical guidelines, and we support initiatives that the Board may implement to obtain fair resolution to such breach, or to resort to remedies as provided for in our Constitution.

 

OAS
PRIVACY POLICY

PREAMBLE

The Ontario Archaeological Society (OAS) respects and protects the privacy of all individuals who have any dealings with the Society. Individually identifiable information about you is not willfully disclosed to any third party without first receiving your express and specific permission, as explained in this Information Privacy Policy

The OAS Information Privacy Policy is in effect for all of the OAS including its Chapters.

1. The OAS will collect unique information about you, such as your name, address, phone number, e-mail address, only when you specifically and knowingly provide such information. From time to time the OAS may conduct surveys of its membership for specific purposes. The purposes of the surveys and the use of the information provided by the participants will be communicated before any survey is done.

2. The OAS will use the unique identifiable information about you only for the purpose of facilitating communication between the OAS, the OAS Chapters and you. Specifically, the information will be used on mailing lists for the distribution of newsletters, society publications, society business, and specific OAS promotional materials and/or announcements.

3. Any information collected through surveys will be used in reports only on an aggregate basis. No personal identifiable information will be released in any reports without the express and specific permission of the individual concerned.

4. The OAS will not share or sell any unique or identifiable information with any person or organization without the express and specific permission of the person or persons involved.

5. Specific reports or analyses may be divulged publicly, but will contain only aggregate information that will not identify any individuals without their express and specific permission.

6. Any personal and identifiable information provided to the OAS by you through the use of the OAS website will be treated as described above.

7. Should you link to any other website from the OAS website, the information that you provide to the linked website will be governed by the Information Privacy Policy of those websites.

8. The OAS may decide to change this Information Privacy Policy from time to time. If and when we do, we will post those changes on the website and communicate the changes through the newsletter so that you are always aware of the information we collect, how we use it, and under what circumstances we disclose it.

<Jan/04>

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Phone: +1 (416) 406-5959


Email: info@ontarioarchaeology.org

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The Ontario Archaeological Society is a registered charitable organization that promotes the ethical practice of archaeology. The general public, students and professional alike are encouraged to become members of the Society and to support its co-ordinating role in helping to record and preserve our non-renewable cultural heritage. Click here to view membership details.

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